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For other uses, see Fuse.

For other uses, see Fuse.

 

In electronics and electrical engineering a fuse (from the Latin "fusus" meaning to melt) is a type of sacrificial overcurrent protection device. Its essential component is a metal wire or strip that melts when too much current flows, which interrupts the circuit in which it is connected. Short circuit, overload or device failure is often the reason for excessive current.

 

 

A fuse interrupts excessive current (blows) so that further damage by overheating or fire is prevented. Wiring regulations often define a maximum fuse current rating for particular circuits. Overcurrent protection devices are essential in electrical systems to limit threats to human life and property damage. Auto Fuse are selected to allow passage of normal current and of excessive current only for short periods.

 

 

In 1847, Breguet recommended use of reduced-section conductors to protect telegraph stations from lightning strikes; by melting, the smaller wires would protect apparatus and wiring inside the building. [1] A variety of wire or foil fusible elements were in use to protect telegraph cables and lighting installations as early as 1864 [2]

 

 

A fuse was patented by Thomas Edison in 1890 [3] as part of his successful electric distribution system.

 

12.11.10 08:50

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